Campus Muslims Celebrate End of Eid Holiday

Banquet, performances mark end of holy Muslim holiday

Imam Abdul Waheed, Interim Muslim Chaplain at Duke, far right, leads the prayer during the Duke Muslim Students Association's annual Eid Banquet on Saturday evening at Penn Pavilion.

Imam Abdul Waheed, interim Muslim chaplain at Duke, far right, leads the prayer during the Duke Muslim Students Association's annual Eid Banquet Saturday. Photo by Megan Mendenhall/Duke Photography

Campus Muslims filled Penn Pavilion Saturday night to commemorate Eid al-Adha, the end of the annual Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and one of the most holy holidays in the Islamic tradition. The three-day religious ceremony celebrates family, friends and praises Allah for providing food and shelter.

In Islamic tradition, the ceremony is tied to the story of the willingness of Abraham to sacrifice that which was most dear to him, his son Ishmael, to show his obedience to God. God intervened, accepting Abraham's act of worship, and instead a ram was sacrificed.

Duke Dhamaka performs during the Duke Muslim Students Association's annual Eid Banquet

Professor Omid Safi, director of Duke Islamic Studies Center, spoke during the banquet. The ceremony also included dance and choral performances by student groups the Duke Amandla Chorus, Duke Rhydhun, Duke Sangeet, Duke Dhamaka and other groups, and comic skits by association members.

Amir Azhar, left, and Parmida Mostafavi, right, both members of the Duke Muslim Students Association, welcome guests to the annual Eid Banquet on Saturday evening at Penn Pavilion.

Guests enjoy the food at the Eid banquet.

Imam Abdul Waheed, interim campus Muslim minister, led the participants in prayer before the meal. Around 500 people attended the ceremony, which was organized by the Duke Muslim Student Association.