Two Scholars Look Back at 50 Years of the Duke Lemur Center

Director Anne Yoder and co-founder Peter Klopfer reflect on the center's past, present and future

For 50 years, the Duke Lemur Center has advanced scholarship and biological conservation through interdisciplinary research on lemurs – Earth’s most threatened group of mammals. The center houses the world’s largest and most diverse collection of lemurs outside of Madagascar, and the current colony houses nearly 250 individuals across 18 species.

The scientific endeavors at the DLC span an array of disciplines, from behavior and genomics to brain sciences and paleontology. Over its history, the DLC has brought together scientists, conservation biologists and educators in North Carolina and in Madagascar to understand and to protect these extraordinary animals.

To mark the anniversary, the center will hold a Scientific Symposium and Gala on Sept. 21-23 at the Washington Duke Inn and Golf Club.

The symposium will bring together leading scholars engaged with research at the Duke Lemur Center, spanning a vast array of disciplines, from behavior and genomics to brain sciences and paleontology. It will include poster sessions, and panel discussions presenting the latest research on lemur biology and behavior, evolution and conservation.

For more information about the center’s anniversary and the symposium, visit the center’s website.