Mignolo Joins International Scholars on Dialogue of Civilizations Program Council

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Walter Mignolo

Professor Walter Mignolo, director of the Center for Global Studies and The Humanities at Duke University, has joined the Dialogue of Civilizations (DOC) Program Council as a senior adviser. The council, which includes world-renowned scholars and intellectual leaders, oversees the operations and strategy of the DOC Research Institute.

The purpose of the institute is to build a community of leading thinkers and create a space for constructive dialogue among the major civilizations of the modern world. The DOC Research Institute performs research and publishing policy and facilitates diverse events to become an effective instrument of forecasting the latent disturbances and possible conflicts among different cultures and civilizations aiming to make the world a more just, sustainable and peaceful place for all people and nations.

The DOC has six overarching themes for its upcoming discussion: Civilizations Against the Threat of Social Regress (New Barbarism); Economics of Postmodernity: When Conventional Models Fail; Life Space for Humanity: Protection of the Humane in Humans; Policies, Institutions and Processes for Global Inclusive Development; East and West: Bridging the Postmodernity Gap; and Infrastructure as the Backbone of Global Inclusive Development.

Under its thematic framework, the DOC has accepted six topics for Special Reports: New Barbarians, East or West, Home is Best!, Pensions: Could the biggest social gain of the XX century turn on itself?, The Demographic Curse – is there still a way out?, Adjusting International Development Agencies for Solidary Development in the 21-st Century, and From the World of Railways to Information Super Highways and Back.

Mignolo is William H. Wannamaker Professor in the Program of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke and author of of The Idea of Latin America (2006) and most recently The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options (2011).