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Get help flipping your classroom

Primary Topic: 
Education & Classroom Learning

Imagine students coming to class having learned basic concepts, and prepared to apply their knowledge.  During class time, students work in teams to solve problems. Faculty listen as students discuss problems, and can identify difficult concepts and address them right when students need help. This is a “flipped classroom.”  Duke faculty who have flipped their classrooms have been delighted to be able to work with students during their classes.  Faculty can see exactly where students are struggling and respond right then, modifying the approach and goals for the unit, rather than waiting until an exam to find out where students are having difficulty.

How can you flip your classroom? Join us for workshops, led by Larry Michaelsen, who has been teaching this way for a number of years, and has worked out techniques to ensure student learning. These workshops will give faculty hands-on experience and guidelines for teaching students.  Please plan to attend!


Flipping your classroom with well-designed group work

Tuesday 11/06/2012
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Perkins Library Room 217

Want to flip your classroom? Imagine your students coming to class having learned the concepts, prepared to apply their knowledge. In this session, participants will engage in a series of activities that demonstrate how to design assignments for effective group work. In addition, you will learn about four keys that will enable you to design group assignments that:

  1. are effective for developing students’ application and critical-thinking skills,
  2. promote positive student attitudes about group work,
  3. can be graded easily and fairly and,
  4. can be used with any level of students and in classes of up to several hundred students.

Registration is required. Participants will be tested on assigned reading.


Turning Good Group Assignments into Great Ones

Tuesday 11/06/2012
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Perkins Library Room 217

During this workshop, attendees will engage in a series of activities that demonstrate four keys for designing group assignments that:

  • are effective for developing students’ application and critical-thinking skills,
  • promote positive student attitudes about group work,
  • can be graded easily and fairly and,
  • can be used with any level of students and in classes of up to several hundred students.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to:

  • Apply these strategies to design and/or improve assignments for use in their own courses.
  • Identify strategies for dealing with contextual problems such as large classes, classrooms designed for lectures–not group work, resistance from traditionally focused students, faculty peers, and administrators.

Registration is required.

Participants are expected to:

  • Be familiar with the structure and key elements of TBL (Michaelsen & Sweet 2009).
  • Complete a pre-workshop assignment that involves identifying and describing a group assignment that was either a “winner” or a “loser” (see attached) to be shared and, in most cases, modified during the workshop.

About the workshop leaders:

Larry Michaelsen, Professor, University of Central Missouri, invented team-based learning, a comprehensive group-based instructional strategy now being used in hundreds of disciplines and by thousands of faculty in at least 23 different countries.  This strategy is the basis for TeamLEAD, Duke’s successful curriculum at Duke-NUS; faculty across Duke are implementing his strategy.

Dr. Doyle Graham will join Dr. Michaelsen. A former Professor of Pathology and Dean of Medical Education (1987-1992) at Duke, Doyle G. Graham has been involved since early 2007 in the establishment of Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore as Director of the Body and Disease course. He was among the first faculty trained by Professor Michaelsen in the principles of TBL at Duke-NUS and has worked since then to enhance its application to medical education there.

pubDate: 
October 16, 2012