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Lefkowitz and Brodhead to Hold Public Conversation Nov. 1

Lefkowitz and Brodhead to Hold Public Conversation Nov. 1

 

Dr. Robert Lefkowitz, the Duke researcher who the 2012 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, will discuss research, student mentoring and other topics with Duke's president 

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Durham, NC - Dr. Robert J. Lefkowitz, the Duke researcher who earlier this month received the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and Duke President Richard Brodhead will discuss research, scientific mentoring and other topics in a public discussion at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, in the Bryan Center's Griffith Theater.

Brodhead introduced Lefkowitz at an Oct. 10 press conference, which was webcast live to a worldwide audience. More recently, Duke students cheered Lefkowitz with chants of "he's so smart!" when he was honored during the men's basketball team's Countdown to Craziness celebration. Lefkowitz also has participated in several private events on campus since winning the award.

The Nov. 1 event will be the first opportunity since the announcement, however, for students and other members of the campus community to speak directly with Lefkowitz about his long career at Duke and how his life has changed since winning the prize. It will open with a conversation between him and Brodhead, then expand to include questions from the audience.

Lefkowitz is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator who has spent his entire 39-year research career at the Duke University Medical Center. He shared the prize with Brian K. Kobilka of Stanford University School of Medicine, who was a post-doctoral fellow in Lefkowitz's lab in the 1980s. They were recognized for their work on a class of cell surface receptors that have become the target of prescription drugs, including antihistamines, ulcer drugs and beta blockers to relieve hypertension, angina and coronary disease.

The event is open to the public. No tickets or reservations are required. A video of the conversation will be made available on Duke on Demand soon after the event is completed.

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